MUVE Gaming and Community Engagement

Note: As part of one of my classes for grad school, I have to post a series of posts on predetermined topics. This is one of those posts.

First of all, I don’t live under a rock. I have heard of MUVE games before, but have never engaged in them. Second Life started just about the time I graduated from college, and while interesting, what I heard mostly was about the inappropriate ways people were using the game (not surprising to anyone).

Because I don’t know a lot about MUVEs, I asked two of my friends, Jason and Tori, their thoughts.

Jason said, “I definitely think that they [MUVEs] foster community and allow people to express themselves in a number of ways. It’s pretty amazing that I have people that I play with that I’ve never met in real like or know what they look like – and I would consider them close friends.”

Tori, who actually met her husband online gaming, said, “[They] offer a collaborative environment to socialize and essentially engage in play with others. Downsides are the same as any time you get a group of people together: people being rude, vulgar and sex-centric. I also think they can be particularly addictive because of the social component.”

I think libraries and librarians can use these technologies to reach people in new ways; if someone won’t come to the library, help the library come to them. My local library has Minecraft nights that involve both kids and parents, which allows everyone to know what happens in this virtual world. Libraries need to be proactive; don’t create a space for your library in a MUVE environment if you’re not going to keep it up and keep it active. Like social media, MUVEs can be used to enhance the library experience for people or detract from it.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: